The Verdict.

Matthew 13:12
[12]For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath.

The above verse is one of those verses that I had serious difficulty putting together. Every time I came across it, I always left it with a sense of what does it all mean.

My challenge stemmed from the “b” part, which says but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath. I wondered, how can we take away something from him that hath nothing. I mean, what precisely is going to be taken from such a person haven conceded that he has nothing.

However, the key I found was in the hath not. I had always thought that it was a primary lack. But it didn’t stand up to scrutiny. Another Parable of Jesus concerning the servants had the lock to the key.

In the parable of the talents, we remember the last servant, who hid the talent that was given to him. Notice how that played out:

Matthew 25:28-30
[28]Take therefore the talent from him, and give it unto him which hath ten talents.
[29]For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.
[30]And cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

In following the passage, you will find that the hath not – referred to an absence of profit, output, result, product following an initial deposit. And in absence of those, the initial deposit, seed or talent which in this case represents even that he hath, will be taken away.

We then realize that for everything, in whatever shape or size or format or package that the Lord gives us, as our master, He expects, demands and looks forward to the results thereof.

What then is the verdict? It is that for the “tradeables” and the “sowables” that the Lord gives us, he expects and looks forward to results, and on the day He comes looking for them, their absence could mean the end of those processes.

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